Victor Moscoso and His Legendary Posters

by Katy Trosch

nr-12-212x300 Victor Moscoso and His Legendary PostersVictor Moscoso was an art school trained artist when he moved to San Francisco in 1959. He went on to create some of the most visually stunning collectible psychedelic concert posters of all time. One of the “big five” artists of the psychedelic era, his work is regarded as some of the best.

Moscoso’s Artwork

mosco-214x300 Victor Moscoso and His Legendary Posters

Victor Moscoso attended art school at Cooper Union in New York as well as at Yale University. He moved to San Francisco to further his studies at the San Francisco Art Institute. In 1966, he began to design posters for the Family Dog’s dance concerts after finding himself fascinated with the posters he’d see on the street. In order to design psychedelic posters, Moscoso had to learn to forget much of his formal training. He began to make use of “vibrating colors”, a technique inspired by Josef Albers, one of his professors at Yale.

head-hunters-1-300x300 Victor Moscoso and His Legendary PostersAfter designing many posters for Chet Helms and the Family Dog, Moscoso approached the Matrix, another San Francisco venue. He offered to design posters for them for free in exchange for exclusive rights to his art and the ability to sell extra posters. This deal resulted in the Neon Rose series, which ended up bringing Moscoso international attention during the 1967 “Summer of Love”. He is also well known for his work in underground comix, and for creating album covers. He has contributed work to Zap Comix, and designed some key album artwork, including the cover of Herbie Hancock’s Head Hunters. Moscoso is the first psychedelic poster artist to have his work put on display at the Museum of Modern Art.

Collecting Victor Moscoso’s Posters mosc-237x300 Victor Moscoso and His Legendary Posters

Moscoso has produced countless collectible posters. His work for the Family Dog, Bill Graham, and Neon Rose series’ are among the most sought out posters. They are highly unique and recognizable, generally featuring vibrant shades of blue, pink, and orange. The font that appears on the cover of The Beatles’ Rubber Soul inspired Moscosco’s bubble lettering style. There are several Moscoso posters out there that he signed himself, which can increase their value.

For a better look at the value of Victor Moscoso’s Family Dog posters, check out our brand new concert poster price guide! We just launched a free preview of this collecting tool exclusively featuring the Family Dog series. It’s easy to use and can help you research the value of various concert posters, as well as learn more about each band, artist, and poster series. If you are new to concert poster collecting, this is a great way to familiarize yourself with the poster market. If you’ve been collecting for years, this can help you assess the value of your current collection! Make sure to take advantage of the preview while it’s still free.

 

FOOTER_Poster-scaled Victor Moscoso and His Legendary Posters

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